Selene, Waning Gibbous

Moon

f13 @ 1/125 ISO200 300mm : Nikon D50, 18 November 2013

Shot from my front porch at 9:20pm Eastern Time

The Moon is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face with its near side marked by dark volcanic maria that fill between the bright ancient crustal highlands and the prominent impact craters. It is the brightest object in the sky after the Sun, although its surface is actually dark, with a reflectance just slightly higher than that of worn asphalt. Its prominence in the sky and its regular cycle of phases have, since ancient times, made the Moon an important cultural influence on language, calendars, art and mythology. The Moon’s gravitational influence produces the ocean tides and the minute lengthening of the day. The Moon’s current orbital distance, about thirty times the diameter of the Earth, causes it to appear almost the same size in the sky as the Sun, allowing it to cover the Sun nearly precisely in total solar eclipses. This matching of apparent visual size is a coincidence. The Moon’s linear distance from the Earth is currently increasing at a rate of 3.82±0.07 cm per year, but this rate is not constant.

From Wikipedia

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